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Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Good Morning and Welcome! to The Fool’s Tarot for 04/10/2017; today’s deck is *Le Tarot des grands initiés de l’ancienne Egypte* by Jean-Louis Victor, Editions de Mortagne, 1979.  The Tarot comes with an eponymous book, quite useful. (French only.) As I cannot find images online for it, and as my scanner is on the fritz for the time being, I am going to substitute images of the Egyptian pantheon which summarize the qualities of the cards drawn. I used the OLD Alchemical Basic Spread, with three Major Arcana placed in Sulfur, Mercury & Salt, instead of using a Court Card for Salt, as I usually do. This is the original spread, and placing the archetypes themselves in the places drawn works well. My draw today is: Sulfur = II Le Sanctuaire; Mercury = Le Soleil, and Salt = L’Initié. (I trust I don’t need to translate the obvious.)  The deities within these archetypes/Arcana are Isis, Re and Thoth (Hermes Trismegistus, a Greek construct based on Thoth.) Therefore, the information I provide today is about these “god constructs” rather than about the cards. It is a change from normal Tarot, but still valid, I feel. “Abstracts of Tarot,” perhaps . . . ? At any rate, this is all due to a scandalously late rising this morning: my cats allowed me to sleep until 8:00 a.m., when normally I’m up at the latest by 5:00 a.m. I knew this would be a simpler, more “concentrated” draw, thus . . . . I ask the Cosmos today to grant us ALL the luxury of a bit of extra rest sometime today. Be Well, Be Zen, Be Blessed!!                                           
II Le Sanctuaire – “One of the most important legends told about Isis concerns the birth of Horus and the scorpion myth. This story begins with Set sealing Osiris in a coffin and throwing it into the Nile. This devastated Isis, so she searched for him and found the coffin inside a cedar column in another land. She brought Osiris back to Egypt and mourned him. Set found the coffin, removed Osiris’ body and tore it into fourteen pieces. Isis wept as she searched for the pieces and Nepthys heard her. Nepthys helped Isis find thirteen of the pieces but a Nile creature ate the final piece [his penis.] Thoth taught Isis a spell that allowed her to reassemble Osiris and she used wax to replace the missing piece. The spell also restored Osiris to life for one night, he and Isis had intercourse and she conceived Horus. The next morning, Osiris went to the Tuat. Set imprisoned Isis but Thoth helped her escape. Isis traveled surrounded by her seven scorpion goddesses; Tefen, Befen, Mestet, Mestetef, Petet, Thetet and Maatet. They traveled until they came to a village near a papyrus swamp. Isis knocked on the door of a rich woman, seeking aid, but the woman sent her away. Then she came to the home of a peasant woman who took Isis into her home. The seven scorpion goddesses were angry so Tefen returned to the rich woman’s house, stung her son and set the house on fire. Isis heard the woman’s grief and restored her son’s life. She gave birth to Horus in a papyrus bed and hid him from Set. One day, Set sent a scorpion to sting Horus but Isis was able to save him.” (http://www.ancient-egypt-online.com)  
 XIX LE Soleil – “Ra was an ancient god, but not the oldest of the gods; the first references to Ra date from the Second Dynasty. However, by the Fifth Dynasty he was a powerful god who was closely associated with the pharaoh. The Pharaoh was already seen as the embodiment of Horus and so the two gods became linked, sometimes as the composite deity Ra-Horakhty ("Ra (is) Horus of the Horizon"). Ra also came to be associated with Atum (the creator god of the Ennead in Heliopolis) as Atum-Ra. By the Fifth Dynasty the pharaoh was referred to as the son of Ra and the name of Ra was incorporated into the throne name of every king from that point onwards. Many Old Kingdom pharaohs built sun temples in which to worship Ra. The Middle Kingdom saw the rise to prominence of Amun of Thebes. Although Ra kept his association with the pharaoh, he was to some degree absorbed by Amun as Amun-Ra. However, the priests of Amun became very wealthy and influential and so some of the pharaohs of the New Kingdom chose to elevate Ra in his stead, perhaps partly because he was already closely associated with the pharaoh. For example, Thuthmosis promoted Re-Horakhty as his favored god while Amenhotep III took the epithet "the dazzling sun" and named his wife's pleasure boat "the Aten Gleams". His successor (and probable son) Akhenaten went one step further and rejected Amun and many of the other gods in favor of The Aten (a solar god).” (http://www.ancientegyptonline.co.uk.)                                                    I 
L’Initié – “Thoth (Tehuty, Djehuty, Tahuti, Tehuti, Zehuti, Techu, Tetu) was one of the earlier Egyptian gods. He was popular throughout Egypt, but was particularly venerated in Khnum (Hermopolis Magna) where he was worshipped as part of the Ogdoad. As the power of his cult grew, the myth was rewritten to make Thoth the creator god. According to this variant, Thoth (in the form of an ibis, one of his sacred animals) laid an egg from which Ra (Atum, Nefertum, or Khepri) was born. Other myths suggest that Thoth created himself through the power of language (in an interesting parallel to the phrase in the Gospel according to St John "in the beginning was the word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God"). His song was thought to have created eight deities of the Ogdoad (the gods Nun, Heh, Kuk and Amun and the goddesses Nunet, Hauhet, Kuaket and Amaunet). The moon and the sun were initially thought of as the left and right eyes of Horus. According to legend, Horus' left eye (the moon) was injured in a fight with Set and was restored by Thoth ("the eye of Horus"). However, as time progressed the moon came to be associated with Thoth, possibly because the crescent moon resembled the beak of an Ibis. During the Late period Thoth gained prominence when Khnum (Hermopolis Magna) became the capital. Archeologists found thousands of mummified ibis who were buried with honor in his name. Although Osiris and Isis were generally credited with bringing civilization to mankind, Thoth was also thought to have invented writing, medicine, magic, and the Egyptian´s civil and religious practices. He was even credited with the invention of music, which was more often associated with Hathor. Thoth was the patron of scribes and of the written word. He was scribe of the underworld who recorded the verdict on the deceased in the hall of Ma´at and was given the epithets "He who Balances", "God of the Equilibrium" and "Master of the Balance". Thoth maintained the library of the gods with the help of his wife, Seshat (the goddess of writing). He was the scribe of the gods, and was often described as the "Lord of the Divine Body", "Scribe of the Company of the Gods", the "voice of Ra" or the "counsellor of Ra" who (along with Ma'at) stood on the sun barge next to Ra on his nightly voyage across the sky. It was also thought that Ra gave Thoth and area of the underworld to rule in the "Land of the Caves", He kept a register of those in his realm and decreed just punishments for their transgressions and acted as Ra´s representative in the afterlife. In this role, his wife was Ma´at.” (http://ancientegyptonline.co.uk)    

 

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